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Gatwick trials boarding according to seat number

Gatwick airport will be trialling a new technique to board passengers by prioritising entry times according to seat numbers. With claims to reduce boarding times by 10%, Gatwick pledge to make the process, “faster, more relaxing and, potentially, reduce the need for large numbers of passengers to rush forward at any stage.”

 

The new technique includes boarding passengers by seat number, starting from the back to the front. Window seats will be prioritised first followed by middle and aisle seats. The trial will take place over two months, during which the airport will use data and passenger feedback to determine the new technique should be implemented. 

The world's longest flight: 10,000 miles and 19 hours long

Restrictions were put in place to ensure the feasibility of the experiment; a handful of passengers, no cargo and a restricted baggage allowance. There are currently no commercial aircrafts that are able to carry out such a long-haul flight with full passenger capacity and cargo. Researchers tracked the biological effect of the crew, including melatonin levels, and brain activity.

 

Passengers were photographed exercising during the flight,  reducing the risk of jet lag. As well as attempting to improve strategies for passenger comfort and wellbeing, the experiment attempts to test the viability of Qantas servicing this route.

NH Hotel Group pledges to reduce carbon emissions

NH Hotel Group say that their incentive is to cut greenhouse gasses across its entire business chain. Rufino Perez, Global Transformation Leader at NH says, “the fact that we have set a science-based target is going to help us advance towards a business model that is compatible with a low-carbon economy.”

 

The company has been supporting climate change since 2007 and have managed to reduce their operations carbon footprint by 67%. Perez further explains that “now is the time to be even more ambitious with our sustainability targets.”

Williams Review says reformation work with begin in 5-10 years

The Williams Rail Review (a review which attempts to improve the structure of the rail industry), is set for publication this Autumn. However, although reform was pledged in 2020, new commentary claims the reformation to take place between five to ten years.

 

Former British Airways Chief Executive, Keith Williams was questioned by ministers on the progress of the report. Concerned of the implications of a General Election, Williams was asked whether his plans would be cancelled out under a new Government.

 

Williams explains that the Department for Transport is inclined to push reformation plans forward including, passenger accessibility and its current franchise model, but that the reformation will happen in the far future due to implications putting plans on hold.

KLM Airlines turn plastic bottles into repair tools as a pledge to reduce waste

KLM Royal Dutch Airlines is recycling empty bottles and turning them into aircraft repair tools. The airline company has implemented this new strategy in an attempt to reduce waste by 50% by 2030. The bottles are collected after every flight and then recycled into filament, a material used in 3D printing. The company uses 3D-printing to speed up repair and maintenance processes but will now send plastic bottles made of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) to a recycling company in exchange for plastic pellets. 

 

Executive Vice President of Engineering and maintenance at KLM says, “we are continuously investing in sustainable and innovative products and processes. It’s terrific to see how we can make useful products from waste materials.”

 

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